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395-423
Arcadius.jpg (3815 bytes)
Flavius Arcadius
Emperor
395-408

  After Theodosius died, Arcadius [b. 377] became ruler of the East. His weak character  (he may have been mentally defective) resulted in  power residing in the stronger members of his court, thus he had  little influence on government. Arcadius died at 31, succeeded by  Theodosius II.
Relatives depicted on coins:
Eudoxia - wife

Honorius.jpg (4534 bytes)
Flavius Honorius
Emperor
395-423

After Theodosius died,  Honorius [b. 384] ruled the West. When Stilicho was overthrown in 408, the Goths invaded Italy, sacking Rome. Honorius did little to redress this, or later invasions, ingloriously expiring in 423.

Relatives depicted on coins:
Galla Placidia
-half-sister
Usurpers: Constans, Maximus

Constantine3.jpg (5366 bytes)
Constantine III
Emperor
407-411

Constantine revolted in Britain [407], then went to Gaul, ravaged by barbarians  under the weak Honorius. He took the garrison of Britain, thereafter left to defend itself. In 408 he captured Spain, but lost it to the Germans through treachery. He  was captured in 411 by Constantius, and later executed.

Attalus.jpg (5528 bytes)
Priscus Attalus
Emperor
409-410,
414-415

Attalus, Alaric's puppet, was proclaimed by the Senate after Alaric's first siege of Rome. He was deposed in 410,  but in 414 Alaric's successor again proclaimed him emperor, and he reigned another year before again being deposed and banished to Lipara.

Jovinus.jpg (5378 bytes)
Jovinus

Emperor
411-413

Jovinus was proclaimed by the Alans and Burgundians,  reigning in Gaul two years before the Visigoths (allied with Honorius) captured him. He was then executed.

Relatives depicted on coins:
Sebastianus - brother

Constantius3.jpg (4837 bytes)
Flavius Constantius (III)
Emperor
421

Constantius, among the few real commanders in Honorius' regime  after Stilicho, became general in chief after many successes against usurpers and invaders. He married the half sister of Honorius, then was named Augustus. Constantinople did not recognize him, and had he not died six months later, civil war would probably have followed.
   

R4250 0364 Honorius: AR clipped siliqua (minim)
$75.00
Obv. D N HONORIVS P F AVG Diad., dr. & cuir. bust r.
Rev. VIRTVS ROMANORVM Roma seated facing
1.10 g
Sear 4250; CD. 59 Clipped to minim standard, otherwise good VF
During the decline and abandonment of Roman authority in Britain during the early fifth century, clipping (shaving the edges) of silver siliquae became prevalent. The practice seems to have begun after a decline in the official weight standard (to approximately half the original weight of the siliqua) for coins struck in Italy. These clipped siliquae were known as "minims" (smallest coins), and became the ancestors of the Saxon sceattas and medieval deniers.

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R4252 0404 Honorius: AE 2 (23 mm)
$95.00
Obv. D N HONORIVS P F AVG
Diad., dr. & cuir. bust r.
Rev. GLORIA ROMANORVM
Honorius stg. r. hldg. globe
Sear 4252; RIC 46c 4.44 g
good VF

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