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423-476
Under each image is a symbol for the most frequent variety (often a small bronze) in  major collections: C
Common
S
Scarce
Most collections
R
Rare
15-30 known
R2
Very Rare
10-15 known
R3
Extremely Rare
5-10 known

Johannes.jpg (3993 bytes)
R2

Valentinian3.jpg (4238 bytes)
C
Petronius.jpg (4996 bytes)
R3
Avitus.jpg (4004 bytes)
R2
Majorian.jpg (6108 bytes)
S
Johannes
423-425
Placidius Valentinianus III
425-455
Relatives : Eudoxia - wife; Honoria - sister
Petronius
Maximus
455
M.  Maecilius Fl. Eparchius Avitus
455-456
Julius Valerianus Majorianus
457-461

Johannes succeeded Honorius, but was not recognized in Constantinople and was deposed. Valentinian III was a nonentity controlled first by his mother, then by Aetius. During his reign conditions in the West deteriorated and Africa fell to the Vandals; after killing Aetius, Valentinian was overthrown by Petronius Maximus, and his widow was forced to marry Petronius. She appealed to Gaiseric who "vandalized" Rome, and Petronius was killed by the mob. Avitus assumed the throne, but exactions to pay his allies caused a revolt. The energetic Majorian followed and defeated the Visigoths, but his expedition to recover Africa was betrayed to the Vandals. This ended hope for recovery in the West, and for Majorian, who was deposed and executed by Ricimer.

Severus3.jpg (4929 bytes)
R
Anthemius.jpg (5140 bytes)
R
Olybrius.jpg (6283 bytes)
R3
Glycerius.jpg (3659 bytes)
R3
Nepos.jpg (3906 bytes)
R2
Romulus.jpg (4718 bytes)
R2
Libius Severus
461-465
Procopius Anthemius
467-472
Anicius
Olybrius
472
Glycerius
473-474
Julius Nepos
474-480
Romulus Augustus
475-476

Ricimer's puppet Severus III ruled four years. Eighteen months after his death Leo appointed Anthemius. He did not get along with Ricimer, who then proclaimed Olybrius, beseiged Rome and killed Anthemius. Olybrius shortly died and Ricimer's successor proclaimed Gycerius, not recognized in Constantinople, which sent Julius Nepos to assume the Western throne. After a year Orestes overthrew him in favor of his son Romulus; Nepos then reigned in Dalmatia until 480. In 476, Odovacar sent a deputation to Constantinople declaring that there was no further need for an emperor in the West.

   

R4250 0364 Honorius: AR clipped siliqua (minim)
$75.00
Obv. D N HONORIVS P F AVG Diad., dr. & cuir. bust r.
Rev. VIRTVS ROMANORVM Roma seated facing
1.10 g
Sear 4250; CD. 59 Clipped to minim standard, otherwise good VF
During the decline and abandonment of Roman authority in Britain during the early fifth century, clipping (shaving the edges) of silver siliquae became prevalent. The practice seems to have begun after a decline in the official weight standard (to approximately half the original weight of the siliqua) for coins struck in Italy. These clipped siliquae were known as "minims" (smallest coins), and became the ancestors of the Saxon sceattas and medieval deniers.

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